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Facing an uphill task, Haley chugs along but rules out third party run

Despite a fervent stance against Trump, Haley categorically rules out a third-party run in the event of defeat in the party's electoral battle

Facing an uphill task, Haley chugs along but rules out third party run / X/ @NikkiHaley

Republican presidential candidate Nikki Haley continues her campaign sweep across the D.C., Maryland, and Virginia area ahead of the crucial Super Tuesday primaries. The former United Nations ambassador, drawing attention to her fundraising prowess, notes that she outpaced contributions from Trump in January, emphasizing the ongoing financial support.

Continuing her campaign sweep across the D.C., Maryland, and Virginia region ahead of the Super Tuesday primaries, Republican presidential candidate Nikki Haley is undeterred by financial challenges. 

Facing a substantial 64-point deficit against her main rival in the Super Tuesday States, Haley delivers a scathing critique of Trump's policies during her address to Republican supporters in Washington DC. She advocates for a departure from what she deems "four years of chaos," questioning the need for continuity in leadership.

“When I started the race…we had 14 people in the race. I defeated a dozen of the fellas. I just have one more I have to catch up to, Do we want more of the same or do we want to go in a new direction?" Haley asked her supporters in Washington DC. 

In a significant boost to her campaign, Moderate Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski became the first senator to endorse Haley, breaking ranks with most GOP leaders who align themselves with Trump. Murkowski's defiance stems from her personal history with Trump, who vowed to campaign against her in 2021. However, this threat did not deter the senator, as she secured another term in 2022. Murkowski's home state of Alaska is among the 15 states holding GOP primaries on Tuesday.

Despite a fervent stance against Trump, Haley categorically rules out a third-party run in the event of defeat in the party's electoral battle. Refuting speculations about leading an independent ticket, she underscores her unwavering Republican allegiance during a media roundtable in Washington. 
Haley says she is stretching her funds. She flew commercial for much of her campaign and stayed in budget hotels. Some of them were "gross places," she said. “All the talk about the independent No Labels, all that — I haven't t talked to anybody about that. I know that they have sent smoke signals, but I'm a Republican,” she said. They don’t ask me, ‘What’s your strategy?’ They don’t ask me, ‘What’s your plan?’ All they say is, ‘Thank you for giving me hope," she added. 

Reflecting on fundraising challenges, Haley discloses her budget-conscious approach, opting for commercial flights and budget hotels during her campaign. She acknowledges the financial stretch and declares, "We're going to continue to stretch," she said. "We're a lean, mean operation." Announcing a $12 million fundraising achievement in February, following a record-setting $16.5 million in January, Haley attributes $8.5 million to grassroots donations, a testament to her widespread support among hardworking Americans disillusioned by Trump's perceived "chaos and division." 

Expressing gratitude for Murkowski's support, Haley said, "I’m grateful to Sen. Murkowski for her support and leadership," Haley said. "Sen. Murkowski represents the best of Alaska — she is a trailblazer and a strong, independent voice who doesn't bow down to the powers that be in Washington. As President, I will fight to make Alaskans — and all Americans — proud by restoring fiscal sanity, energy dominance, and limited government."

Addressing border security and illegal immigration, Haley asserts, “we can't afford to wait one more day for the passage of a robust border Bill; we've got to secure the border, and we've got to secure it.”

Despite a fervent stance against Trump, Haley categorically rules out a third-party run in the event of defeat in the party's electoral battle. Refuting speculations about leading an independent ticket, she underscores her unwavering Republican allegiance during a media roundtable in Washington. 
Haley says she is stretching her funds. She flew commercial for much of her campaign and stayed in budget hotels. Some of them were "gross places," she said. “All the talk about the independent No Labels, all that — I haven't t talked to anybody about that. I know that they have sent smoke signals, but I'm a Republican,” she said. They don’t ask me, ‘What’s your strategy?’ They don’t ask me, ‘What’s your plan?’ All they say is, ‘Thank you for giving me hope," she added. 

Reflecting on fundraising challenges, Haley discloses her budget-conscious approach, opting for commercial flights and budget hotels during her campaign. She acknowledges the financial stretch and declares, "We're going to continue to stretch," she said. "We're a lean, mean operation." Announcing a US$12 million fundraising achievement in February, following a record-setting US$16.5 million in January, Haley attributes US$8.5 million to grassroots donations, a testament to her widespread support among hardworking Americans disillusioned by Trump's perceived "chaos and division." 
 


 

 


 



A recent Roanoke College poll reinforces the narrative that Republicans face challenges with Trump at the forefront. The poll indicates Nikki Haley winning Virginia by nine points over Biden in a general election, while Trump trails by four points. Noteworthy is Trump's loss to Biden, even considering Biden's abysmal 33 percent approval rating. According to Haley's spokesperson AnnMarie Graham-Barnes, "Republicans cannot win with Donald Trump. It’s that simple." The poll also reveals roughly two-thirds of Virginians hold an unfavorable view of both Trump and Biden, with 73 percent thinks the nation is on the wrong track. 



In her interview with CNN’s Dana Bash, Haley underscores the positive aspect of her campaign, focusing on conservative policies, a robust Republican Party, and a vision for a hopeful and free America.

She clarifies, “I am not anti-Trump. I am for America, and the direction America can go. If you look at the Republican Party, I believe in fiscal discipline. I believe in smaller government. I believe we need to stop the wasteful spending. Donald Trump didn't shrink government, he grew government. He put us $8 trillion in debt in just four years, more than any other president. He is not talking about fiscal discipline or debt."

Discussing the path forward for the Republican Party and the country, Haley asserts, “Primaries are about options.” She highlights the positive reception in Virginia, where people express gratitude for providing a viable choice. They seek a leader who can deliver a hopeful America and tangible results without the drama and negativity. Concerns about the future for their children weigh heavily on their minds.

Haley remains focused on the immediate primaries, leaving events beyond Monday unannounced. Addressing speculation about her future decisions, she maintains, "I don't look all the way down the road. My approach has been as long as we're competitive," she said during a roundtable with reporters in Washington DC.
 

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